Results

Results

Raw data are the individual results for each animal. Give no raw data! Only means, standard deviations, statistics, tables, figures, the end products of calculations, etc., that you made should be presented, as they are analyzed data. This practice is important because massive amounts of raw data cause information overload, and the reader cannot easily spot trends or differences.

Whenever possible use the percent difference or change to point out trends quantitatively, ie. "metabolic rate increased 75% in warm temperature." Do not leave it to the reader to figure everything out from your data; you should hit them over the head with it. Do not repeat numbers in the text that you already have in tables, except to point out a specific trend or effect. Make sure you understand what your statistics mean. The units of measurement must be provided with any data - with numbers, tables, and figures

Tables and figures
Tables are entitled and captioned on top, centered if possible.
Figures are entitled and captioned on the bottom, not centered.
Tables are any tabulated data (numbers). Figures are any kind of graphical representation, that is, everything that does not consist of numbers. Figures could be photographs or drawings, but for our purposes most often are graphs. Refer to both tables and figures by number, ie. Figure 1. There are no "Graphs" or "Charts". Captions should describe the Table or Figure well enough to stand alone. Figures can go at the very end of the paper, if you cannot sandwich them into the text.
Data may be presented in Tables or Figures, but you should never present the same data both ways. Choose the method that best demonstrates the point you are making.